AMD Vega blind-test machines point to a launch price of $800 | PCGamesN

AMD Vega blind-test machines point to a launch price of $800

AMD RX Vega benchmarks

I’m a little scared. I’ve been doing maths, and that always makes me, and my numerically challenged self, rather nervous. The results? Well, they might indicate the AMD Vega they’ve been showing off leading up to SIGGRAPH could cost somewhere around $800.

Expensive, no? If that’s too rich for your blood/wallet check out our guide to the best graphics cards around today.

AMD have been taking the RX Vega on tour, showing it up against a GTX 1080-powered PC in blind test conditions. The idea being that they take two PCs, which are identical apart from the monitors, drop an AMD RX Vega GPU in one and an Nvidia GTX 1080 in the other to see which people prefer, or if they can see a difference.

At the Budapest event, attendees were informed the AMD build was around $300 cheaper than the Nvidia machine. That kinda made it sound like they were talking about the graphics card itself. $300 cheaper than a GTX 1080? Sign me up, I’ll have three. Wheeeeeee!

Except now we’re hearing how exactly those two rigs were specced, as HardOCP have had exclusive access to the test machines, recently posting a video and article about their own blind test. HardOCP decided to drop their own GTX 1080 Ti into the Nvidia machine, but both came sporting 16GB of DDR4, running at 2,666MHz, and a Ryzen 7 1800X, all on a Windows 10 64-bit operating system.

Both setups were shipped directly from AMD, after the blind test roadshow, so it seems pretty likely that they were the exact same setups from their recent Radeon RX Vega events.

AMD RX Vega price... show your workings

The scary maths, however, comes from the two monitors that have been used in the blind tests. The AMD machine is running an Asus MX34V FreeSync screen and the Nvidia PC an Asus PG348 G-Sync display. The FreeSync monitor costs $720 and the G-Sync panel retails for $1,300. The cheapest GTX 1080 I can find at the moment is this $510 Gigabyte version over at Newegg. So, with everything else being the same, we can discount the other component costs, making the total relevant price of the Nvidia machine $1,810 at best. 

If the AMD rig is $300 cheaper, that puts it at $1,510. Which in turn means, if you do a little light algebra where X is the cost of the RX Vega, and we subtract the cost of the FreeSync monitor, you get a $790 sticker price for the AMD graphics card.

The same performance as a GTX 1080 for another $300-odd more? That’s going to be a mighty tough sell for AMD, no matter how much you want some HBM2 in your life. Though, of course, my maths could be entirely wrong...

Subnautica
Sign in to Commentlogin to comment
Rock1m1 avatarDave James avatarGen avatarbl00dywarrior667 avatardfab avatar
Rock1m1 Avatar
398
9 Months ago

What's the point. Might as well not release it.

1
Dave James Avatar
608
9 Months ago

They surely can't release it at this price, but there are a lot of rumours doing the rounds right now about it costing near GTX 1080 Ti levels.

I guess the HBM2 manufacturing costs are simply too prohibitive in terms of trying to sell at a reasonable cost. I'm still hoping it's all one big fake-out and they'll ship a $300 RX Vega that knocks the GTX 1080 out of the water.

C'mon... a guy can dream, can't he?

1
Gen Avatar
5
9 Months ago

I very much doubt AMD included the price of the displays, as they both differed massively and AMD had said initially that they were near-identically specced. We know that G-Sync is more expensive because of Nvidia tax and greater complexity, but I don't think if there is $600 difference in the price of the two displays it would have been factored in.

1
Dave James Avatar
608
9 Months ago

I'd love it if the Vega machine was $300 cheaper, just counting the graphics card, that would put Vega at $200. But yeah, probably unlikely.

The screens are near identically specced - both 100Hz, and the same screen size and resolution - but very different prices. AMD wanted to demonstrate the difference, or lack thereof, between FreeSync and G-Sync.

2
bl00dywarrior667 Avatar
5
9 Months ago

This really isn't suprising. AMD released the fury x at 700 and if we are talking about the 1080ti as the competition then it definitely is the water cooling edition of the card. The 1080ti is a bit stronger than the other TIs. (Nvidia pulled some bs) it just worrying what the performance will be like if it benchmark leaks put it at 1080 level.

1
Dave James Avatar
608
9 Months ago

Unfortunately the Vega card in the test machine was a standard, air-cooled version, as you can see from the HardOCP images.

Is this follows then the liquid-chilled version will be $999 :(

GPU pricing is getting ludicrous. I'm really worried $699 is going to become a standard high-end card price. If the Volta-powered GTX 2080 (or whatever it gets called) comes in at $699, FE or otherwise, I'm rioting.

1
dfab Avatar
1
9 Months ago

hmmm, calculations are wonderful things pity the author didn't bother to get the machine specs correct. Try again this time with the massive mislead.

the heading of the blind test wasn't clear enough for you ?

Blind Test - RX Vega FreeSync vs. GTX 1080 TI G-Sync

0
Dave James Avatar
608
9 Months ago

Actually, the original blind tests, carried out by AMD with this set up, at the Budapest event where the $300 price delta was claimed, was of an RX Vega FreeSync vs. GTX 1080 G-Sync pairing.

HardOCP dropped their own GTX 1080 Ti in there themselves for the later blind test.

Kinda moot now the official pricing is out, but that does still show the $300 pricing difference thing was way off and a little misleading.

1